Powers of Attorney

The State of Texas provides a means to grant authority to make decisions to another party through Powers of Attorney. For accounting, property, and financial matters, the Statutory Durable Power of Attorney grants the secondary party the right to access accounts and make withdrawals and other relevant changes if the primary party is unable to act. For health care and medical decisions, the Medical Power of Attorney does the same, with limits by statute - see the sections on Physician's Directive and HIPAA releases for other documents that may be helpful.

If you own any property or accounts worth noting and have a loved one you trust implicitly, it is worthwhile to have a Durable Statutory Power of Attorney, no matter your physical well being or age. The cost and hassle of gaining access to the relevant accounts without the Power of Attorney are simply too great. Likewise, a Medical Power of Attorney will grant that loved one the right to direct your medical care if you are unable to do so.

Give me a call at (512) 743-1711 or email me at brent@burpeelaw.com and I can explain the process of writing and executing the Powers of Attorney, and as quickly as you provide your personal information and testamentary needs, we can begin to create a legal document that will effectuate that intent.